Archive for the ‘Adaptation’ Category

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The fog comes.

January 23, 2017

on little coot feet.

You may have already heard the correct quote the way Carl Sandburg originally wrote it—”The fog comes. on little cat feet…” But this is different. This is coot, not cat. And coots have strange and amazing feet.

Well, just look at them—first of all, they are quite big feet, not little feet!

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And they are not long and skinny-toed like crow feet. Or wide and webbed like duck feet.

Instead, coots do have skinny toes, but with foldable fins on each toe.  So the contrast with crow feet is clear—coots are water birds.

But the contrast with ducks, those other water birds, is extremely interesting. Ducks have webbed feet, with webbing between the toes. When ducks pick up their feet, or move them forward in the water, the whole foot folds, to reduce drag. Then, as they push back, their feet flatten out again, so they press against a lot of water to propel them forward.

Coots use a more subtle system. For them, foldable skin flaps extend out on either side of the toes. When they lift a foot, or move it forward in the water, the flaps fold, reducing the drag against the water. Then when they push back, the flaps widen out and provide a lot of surface area for propulsion. This also helps them walk confidently over bogs or swamps or other kinds of squishy ground.

Plus, these clever feet are picturesque—green and gray and black and white—with striking patterns and colors for someone we think of as just little monochrone water birds.

Well, yes, not to mention red eyes and a red-brown forehead badge, and a charcoal back and white tailfeathers, and their pleasing football-shaped bodies.

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See nictitating membranes in action!

March 24, 2016

There’s a great nature event happening right now. Biologists have set up video cameras to watch a growing bald eagle family in the US National Arboretum in Washington DC, and anyone with an internet connection can watch them at any time.

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You can visit the DC EagleCam, 24 hours a day, at  http://dceaglecam.eagles.org

Even though this is the east coast, bald eagles also winter in the desert, usually in the high country. But the relevant  feature right now is that sometimes you can get a glimpse of the eagle’s nictitating membranes at work.

Here’s how. It’s best to watch in the day time. Click on one of the two cameras so you can more easily see the adult eagle’s eye, and enlarge the image, by clicking the bracket-box at the lower right corner of the video.

You will most often just see the eagle blinking–but every so often, you get to see the “third eyelid” swipe part way or all the way across the eye, starting from the corner nearest the beak. Wow!

And if you get so busy watching the adults and chicks and their activities you forget the third eyelid, that’s OK too!

…..Image taken April 6 2016 from dceaglecam.eagles.org © 2016 American Eagle Foundation, EAGLES.ORG

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Check out the nictitating membranes!

February 20, 2016

If you had to make your living in a desert, or under water, or by sticking your head into a rotting carcass to get your food, you’d probably appreciate a handy combo of goggles and windshield wipers.

And that’s what many creatures, including Turkey Vultures, have.

But instead of using the awkward term “combo-goggles-windshield-wipers,” we use the sleek and easy to remember name, “nictitating membranes.”

Uh huh!

Nictitating membranes are also called third eyelids, and are often translucent, so the eyes get protection while allowing some vision.

Sometimes these thin membranes rest under the lower eyelid, and rise from there, but more often, they are tucked into the corners of the eyes nearest the nose, and move back toward the sides of the head when in operation.

It can be unnerving the first time you see them in motion, a space-alien moment. But when the membrane is closed, it often just looks like a gray or white eyelid.

Here’s a Turkey Vulture doing a demo for you!

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First picture, nictitating membrane is open, and in the second, the translucent membrane is covering the eye.