Posts Tagged ‘Animal homes’

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Who made a saguaro hole in one?

March 26, 2017

Out in the desert, you may hear a loud “Chirrr” sound. Look up, and you may see a flash of black and white wings, then see a brown-headed individual running or hopping up the trunk of a tree, if there are any trees around, or a cactus. If it’s a cactus, that’s got to be a fairly death-defying move, navigating among the thorns.

When you see all of these clues together in southern Arizona or northwestern Mexico, it’s quite likely you have spotted a Gila Woodpecker.

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You can recognise Gila Woodpeckers, Melanerpes uropygialis, both male and female birds, from the thin vivid black and white bars across their wings and back, and their brown heads. In addition, the male has a red patch on his forehead. And, as well as their distinctive “Chirrr” call, they also make loud peeps.

In an unusual and clever tactic, they use their tails to prop them up vertically as they locomote, hunting for insect meals on bark or cactus skin, or when they hammer out nests.

The big black holes you see in the sides of many saguaros? Credit goes to these folks!

They use their strong beaks on their well-cushioned heads to whack nest holes into the sides of saguaro cacti, and if they can find any, other tall woody plants of the desert, including cottonwoods.

The nest holes they excavate in saguaros, which are often used by other birds, eventually harden into “saguaro boots.” These woody, rounded, boot-shaped forms remain even after the saguaro dies, and have been used as containers by humans since the olden days.